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Stud Wall Nomenclature

Click on diagram for explanations.

Stud Wall Nomenclature Sole plate triple stud corner Stud Stud Fireblocks Fireblocks King stud King stud Cripple Stud Header Header Trimmer Stud Trimmer Stud triple stud corner Stud Trimmer Stud Cripple Stud Fireblocks Rough sill Header King stud Sole plate

A - Sole plate - aka floor plate
B - Stud (either 2” x 4” or 2” x 6” on 16” or 24” centers)
C - Fireblocks
D - Cripple stud
E - Header
F - Trimmer stud
G - King stud
H - Rough sill
I - Triple-stud corner (also done in double-stud)

A - Sole plate - aka floor plate
The sole plate is attached to the foundation or sub-flooring, depending on the type of construction. If the sole plate is attached to the foundation, it is secured with anchor bolts which were placed into the wet concrete and allowed to set.

B - Stud (either 2” x 4” or 2” x 6” on 16” or 24” centers)
For many years, using 2" x 4" stud lumber was standard for framing single story houses. Of late, more and more builders (and home owners) prefer the construction advantages of using 2" x 6" stud lumber. Not only is the house much stronger, it is also easier to insulate to a higher R-factor, thereby substantially reducing heating and cooling costs.

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C - Fireblocks
In the event of fire in the walls, the fireblocks slow the progress of the fire. They also add a degree of strength to the wall frame, as well as an additional place to nail interior and exterior wall coverings. These are made from stud-sized lumber.

D - Cripple stud
Cripple studs are used to create the necessary support and strength when framing out windows, doors, wall fans, etc. These are made from stud-sized lumber.

E - Header
The headers bridge the open wall frame spans over doors, windows, wall fans, etc. They are attached to the trimmer studs. There are several ways to build headers, only one way is demonstrated in the artwork. These are made from stud-sized lumber laying on-edge.

F - Trimmer stud
Trimmer studs are placed inside the sides of framed openings for doors, windows, wall fans, etc. Place these carefully so that the item that goes into the opening fits properly, with minimal shimming. These are made from stud-sized lumber.

G - King stud
King studs provide the final support for the exterior of openings created for doors, windows, wall fans, etc. Even though these studs are the same length as the regular wall studs, they may well not hit on the 16" or 24" centers. These are made from stud-sized lumber.

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H - Rough sill
The rough sill is at the bottom of openings created for doors, windows, wall fans, etc. Whatever is being placed inside the opening will rest on the rough sill. Excess space is customarily filled (shimmed) at the top. These are made from stud-sized lumber.

I - Triple-stud corner (also done in double-stud)
Triple-stud corners are rarely used due to the cost of the extra lumber. More commonly, double-stud corners are created by adding spacers. The triple-stud corner is shown here because I prefer them, despite the additional lumber costs. In my opinion, the labor required to build a proper double-stud corner with braces is less desirable than purchasing the extra studs needed for the larger, stronger triple-stud corner. The triple-stud corner also provides excellent nailing surfaces for both interior and exterior wall coverings.

 

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